Education

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ADHD Richmond works closely with local schools. Remember the best approach to help your child is to forge a strong working relationship with your Senco & teachers. They are your friends. Be nice to them. Appreciate them; value their help & understanding and what they are tasked with doing and the relative impossibility of universal success. Don’t antagonise the school staff; get them on your side. Above all, communicate with them as often as possible.

Our national charity, ADDISS,  can offer a variety of training packages for schools focusing on meeting the needs of students with ADHD. Training is delivered by expert ADHD Advisory Teachers.  Contact us in the first instance @ communications@adhdrichmond.org

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It can be hard knowing who to speak to about your child. This MindEd site is a good guide

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Here are the slides from our Talk (April 25 2017) on Education & ADHD by the Director of Education Charis Penfold and Behaviour specialist Kamal Riar: ADHD PRESENTATION – 25.04.17

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Read this information about Special Educational Needs (SEN) and what to do if you think your child has SEN.

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Eva Akins, our SEN lawyer, has produced an excellent document called 101 reasonable Adjustments for ADHD which will guide you through what you can expect for your ADHD student in mainstream or specialist school

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This is a useful Parent- School Communication log to use at meetings about your child ParentTeacherCommunicationLog_ENG 

and here’s how to keep your child’s IEP info neat and tidy

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Advice on School admissions, children and young people with disabilities or special educational needs from the Council for Disabled children

Here are some UK schools which are experienced in ADHD matters and here is another list of schools with SEN experience

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Finding the best school for your ADHD child can be problematic. Here’s the Richmond specialistprovisionprospectus showing what schools are available.

Richmond and Kingston Boroughs may fund out of borough schools to pupils with either a statement or Education, Health and Care Plan  but it is not at all easy and a legal battle can often be the only way to achieve this. Beware that if you choose to send your child before agreement from AfC fees will not be back-dated. Here are some “Out of Borough” schools funded by Richmond or Kingston

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“WHAT IS A PASTORAL SUPPORT PLAN (PSP)?”
A Pastoral Support Plan (PSP) is a school based programme which is meant to help a child to improve their social, emotional and behavioural skills. The PSP will identify precise and specific targets for the child to work towards and should include the child and parents in the drafting process.

When a PSP is thought to be required a PSP meeting should be held during the normal school day. The teachers and the child’s parents will consider whether the child should be present for the whole meeting or only part of it. At the end of the meeting everyone should be clear about what needs to be done, by whom and by when.

PSPs are usually reviewed every 2-4 weeks and usually run for about 16 weeks. If the child has other existing plans (such as an IEP) then the PSP should be integrated with the existing plans and not seen in isolation.

“WHO NEEDS A PASTORAL SUPPORT PLAN (PSP)?”
A PSP may be necessary if a child’s behaviour at school means that they have been permanently excluded or are “at risk” of permanent exclusion. “At risk” means that the child is not responding to the school’s normal range of strategies and support and several short term exclusions may be indicative of this. A PSP will be needed in particular for those children whose behaviour is deteriorating rapidly.

“WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF A PASTORAL SUPPORT PLAN (PSP)?”
The aim of a PSP is to promote the child’s social inclusion and help reduce the possibility of the child’s permanent exclusion. The PSP aims to involve the child in the challenge of improving their behaviour and social skills. As a result of a PSP, a child should be able to better manage their behaviour and/or improve their attendance at school.

“WHAT IS IN A PASTORAL SUPPORT PLAN (PSP)?”
A PSP will set out specific and realistic targets and how they will be measured. The targets should be broken down into smaller parts so that it is more manageable for the child. The PSP will need to identify the input and support from the school and parents that the child will need to help them reach their targets.

The PSP will also detail both the recognition and rewards that the child will receive if they demonstrate efforts to meet the targets as well as the consequences that will result if the child does not demonstrate sufficient efforts to meet the targets. Finally, the PSP should detail the time limit for the duration of the PSP including dates when the PSP will be reviewed.

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EHS

Is your child feeling under pressure from school exams? The Emotional Health Service offers some useful ideas in Dealing with exam stress

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This memorandum by the Special Educational Consortium sets out how best to support and encourage the positive behaviour and engagement of children and children with SEN

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IPSEA

Independent Parental Special Education Advice:  find out what help is available for students sitting exams

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Fresh Start In Education was set up to help children who struggle with education and for whatever reason have been, or are about to be, excluded from regular education

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AfC lgoYou may need to know who to contact at Achieving for Children when considering an education matter. Here’s the  AfC-senior-management-structure

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