Teachers’ info

ADHD Richmond is always pleased to discuss ADHD with teachers and students. Our team includes a SEN teacher who has an ADHD child herself; a 21 year old with ADHD; an ADHD coach; and a SEN solicitor.  Contact us if you’d like us to visit your school: communications@adhdrichmond.org

adhd-in-practice

ADHD in Practice offers these excellent classroom-interventions-for-children-with-adhd First published in ADHD in Practice 2016, Vol 8 No 3. Reproduced with kind permission of Hayward Medical Communications.

***********************************

general-adhd-thumb

Our friend Dr Tony Lloyd of ADHD Foundation offers teachers advice on how to improve learning and achievement for pupils with ADHD

***********************************

adhd-in-practice

This teachers-info-from-adhd-in-practice is an excellent resource

***********************************

capture

This new-combined-teachers-guide-v14-adhdandyou is a valuable resource from ADHD and You

***********************************

Capture

Watch this video about teaching ADHD children

**********************************

hounslow-ichmond-community-healthcare

OT advice from Hounslow & Richmond NHS Community Healthcare on auditory-processing-and-attention-and-concentration-1 processing in the classroom

**********************************

achieving-for-children

Achieving for Children offers ADHD teacher-training . Tell your school to book now. Enter ADHD in Search Events on link for more dates. Tel: 020 8487 5372 Claire.Grayson@achievingforchildren.org.uk

***********************************

Richmond Borough CouncilRichmond’s Neurodevelopmental Team has produced this teacher resource ADHD Pack for Schools

***********************************

Capture Read how teachers can really help children with ADHD in the classroom

***********************************

Child Mind Inst

The Child Mind Institute offers Tips for recognising learning disorders in the classroom

***********************************

Capture

This is an excellent online resource for teachers from ADHD Together

***********************************

capture100’s of custom-created videos from Go Noodle to get kids running, jumping, dancing, stretching, and practicing moments of mindfulness

***********************************

A pupil diagnosed with ADHD and any other pupil who is seriously inattentive, hyperactive or impulsive though without a diagnosis, will find it difficult to:

Concentrate on anything that is not really interesting to him/her

Keep still, or stay in one place for long
Remember what task to be doing, start on time and complete in time
Speak and act appropriately
Be quiet
Cope with change, stress, disappointment or delay.
 
Pupils with ADHD may therefore fall behind academically and socially.
They may also have other learning problems. 
  
The challenge of Understanding ADHD for teachers and other school staff
ADHD varies from child to child and may even seem to vary from day to day in the same child. It can be difficult to distinguish won’t behaviour from can’t behaviour, but it is best to keep a disability perspective towards the child.
We’re not used to thinking of lack of self-control (needed for concentration, learning and good behaviour) as a disability, but for ADHD children it has not developed naturally, and may be a lifelong difficulty. This does not mean they cannot concentrate on things they find absorbing such as computer games, whose high intensity stimulation cuts through the ‘fog’ and over-rides other distractions.
Managing ADHD in school
1. Praise is essential. Look for opportunities, however small.
       Catch them being good.
 
2. Describe and comment on the behaviour you WANT,
       not the behaviour you don’t want.
 
3. Give strong incentives for desired behaviour.
       Rewards work better than punishment.
 
4. Give short achievable targets.
       Give frequent and immediate positive feedback.
 
5. As far as possible ignore unwanted behaviour if not disruptive.
       Give positive feedback if they return to task.
 
6. Alternate sitting-down activities with more physical ones.
       Give frequent opportunities to get up and move around.
       Include the whole class in short exercises or stretches.
       
7. Allow fidgeting or standing up, if this helps the child to
       persevere with a task. Allow space for movement.
 
8. Give directions singly and repeat calmly as necessary.
       Get child’s attention first, with eye contact.
       Get child to repeat out loud, what he/she is going to do.
       Use visual reinforcement.
 
  9. When whole class teaching, seat close to you or try different 
       places to see which works best, e.g. next to sensible children,
       or at the back where others are not distracted and the child
       has room to fidget.
            Use visuals and movement to keep attention.
 
 10. Plan ahead for difficult situations:
        Have alternative activity ready
        Allow a time-out period in a quiet corner
        Accept a shorter concentration time
 
 11. Try to give the ADHD child some responsibility in the classroom.
       When possible let them help another child.
 
 12. Give warning of change-over times coming up.
        Be sure the child has heard and understood.
        State the behaviour expected during change-over,
        in simple clear language.
 
 13. Do not value neatness over content and effort.
       The handwriting of ADHD children is frequently slow and poor.
       Remember that the effort involved for ADHD children is far
        greater than their output would lead us to believe.
       Allow other methods of recording.
14.  Remember to report to parents and other staff the child’s
       positive incidents and achievements.
***********************************

Capture

Teachers – are you missing the ADHD signs in girls?

***********************************

Hear what children want to tell their teachers

***********************************

Capture Watch this video from Dr Geoff Kewley, a Consultant Paediatrician specialising in the management of children with neurodevelopmental, behavioural and learning difficulties, especially ADHD and related issues and in working towards more appropriate service provision for children in educational services.

***********************************

Here’s some guidance for teachers which is useful for parents to read too:

Gov.UK Government statutory guidance on supporting children with SEN. Click the logo

***********************************

TES Click this teacher’s site for an abundance of ADHD material, support and advice  including 50 tips to help teachers and 5 myths teachers need to know

***********************************

ADDISS Our national charity, ADDISS, offers good advice in this schoolreport

***********************************

CaptureClick this photo for some videos, including one on Executive Functions in the Classroom, for teachers to help ADHD students

***********************************

Capture Click the photo for some useful tips for teachers in the classroom

***********************************

young minds - schools The Young Minds charity works extensively with schools & has good SEN resources

***********************************

2045_TES270215_35_ADHDpuzzle  click this for 5 myths schools/teachers need to know about ADHD

***********************************

logo template = plain Click adhd_-_a_practical_guide_for_schools  for some excellent ADHD skills for schools

***********************************

book Click the photo for a teacher’s book by Richmond/Kingston Achieving for Children’s Clinical Psychologist Jo Steer


Capture  Click this photo for Optimus Education’s advice on SEN teaching

***********************************

With an estimated half a million children in the UK thought to have ADHD, Dr Madan Mall and Dr Paul Holland look at educational strategies that can help these young people.

62f2ec8941aa70d8b43ae22ab49b8376 Click to enlarge

***********************************

DAWBAYouth in Mind has some excellent  material for teachers to check for ADHD. Click the photo for more detail

***********************************

sencology Click this blog on EHCP Transition Reviews – experiences and practical advice

**********************************************

Gov.UK Click this advice for providers of supported internships for young people with learning difficulties. It applies to maintained schools, local authorities, academies and free schools, independent schools, sixth-form colleges and further education (FE) colleges

**********************************************

Further useful from ADHD Solutions in school

***********************************

Action-attainment works directly with families, professionals, schools and with community groups to provide understanding, strategies and opportunities for learning, play and friendships.

***********************************

CaptureWatch this Teachers TV video on our YouTube channel

***********************************

EPSON MFP image

The Richmond Borough Educational Psychology Service has produced this leaflet for teachers. Click on it to enlarge

******************************

Capture

Access Arrangements and pre-examination adjustments for ADHD candidates seeking a qualification

******************************

%d bloggers like this: